Monday , 22 January 2018
Advantages & Disadvantages of Diabetic Diets

Advantages & Disadvantages of Diabetic Diets

For every diabetic monitoring your own blood glucose (sugar) levels can be vitally important in controlling your diabetes. The current treatments in diabetes whether medicines or diet focus on trying to keep blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. There are two main ways to monitor the body’s glucose levels, testing for “blood” glucose and testing for “urine” glucose. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. Which method you choose depends on what your doctor advises you.

The primary goal in diabetes management is getting your blood sugar as close to normal as possible. Your doctor can help you determine your blood sugar goals, but in general, those numbers range from 90 to 130 milligrams per deciliter before meals and less than 180 milligrams per deciliter two hours after a meal. The carbohydrates you eat affect your blood sugar. A diabetic diet helps you control the amount of carbohydrates you eat each day and at each meal for better blood sugar management. Good blood sugar control may reduce your risk of diabetes-related complications.




Advantage: Help With Blood Sugar Control

The primary goal in diabetes management is getting your blood sugar as close to normal as possible. Your doctor can help you determine your blood sugar goals, but in general, those numbers range from 90 to 130 milligrams per deciliter before meals and less than 180 milligrams per deciliter two hours after a meal. The carbohydrates you eat affect your blood sugar. A diabetic diet helps you control the amount of carbohydrates you eat each day and at each meal for better blood sugar management. Good blood sugar control may reduce your risk of diabetes-related complications.

 The diabetic diet is a healthy diet in general. The diet encourages you to eat a variety of foods from all the food groups, emphasizing fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean sources of protein and low-fat dairy. The diet also encourages portion control and eating meals regularly. These healthy diet principles are the same recommendations given to someone who wants to lose weight. If you’re overweight or obese and have diabetes, losing as little as 10 pounds can help improve blood sugar.

Disadvantage: Too Rigid

The diabetic diet recommends you eat the same amount of food around the same time every day. Being consistent with the amount and timing of your meals aids in blood sugar control. Some people may have a hard time sticking to a rigid meal schedule. For example, if you are an emergency room nurse, you may have a difficult time eating meals at specified times. Additionally, not being able to eat the right amount of food at specified times can affect how your medication works, causing high or low blood sugars.

Disadvantage: Too Complicated

While there is no one diabetic diet, there are two meal planning tools — the exchange list and carbohydrate counting — used to help people with diabetes eat better. The exchange list divides foods into groups based on similarities in nutritional content, and you are allowed a certain number of servings from each food group based on calorie needs and food preferences. Carbohydrate counting requires you count the number of carbs you eat at each meal and snack, sticking to a specific amount determined by your doctor or dietitian. Both plans require careful counting and measuring of what you eat. Some people may find either of these meal planning tools too complicated to follow.

What Are the Benefits of Okra for People With Diabetes?

What Are the Benefits of Okra for People With Diabetes?

 Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes contributes to the development of deadly conditions like cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. Consuming a healthy diet can help those who have type 1 and 2 diabetes control their blood sugar, and help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are a number of diabetes-related benefits of adding okra to your healthy eating plan.

Glycemic Index

The glycemix index (GI) is a measurement of how quickly carbohydrates in foods turns to sugar in your blood. Regularly consuming low GI foods like okra can help even out roller coaster blood sugar levels and aid in weight control. Okra has a GI below 20, which is considered a “low GI” food.

Kidney Disease

Almost half of all cases of kidney disease are the result of diabetes. Keeping your blood sugar within a healthy range, treating high blood pressure and maintaining a normal body weight can reduce your risk of kidney disease. Additionally, regularly consuming okra can keep kidney disease at bay, according to study results published in the October 2005 “Jilin Medical Journal.” In this study of diabetics, those who ate okra daily reduced clinical signs of kidney damage more than those that simply ate a diabetic diet.

Soluble Fiber

Nearly 50 percent of the fiber found in okra is in the form of soluble fiber. This type of fiber slows digestion, delaying and reducing the impact of carbohydrate-rich foods on blood sugar levels. Eating at least 25 g of fiber per day can help reduce high blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber may also keep your appetite under control, making weight loss easier.

Heart Disease

People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart disease than those that don’t. Diabetics who regularly consume vegetables in general, including okra, reduce their heart disease risk, according to study results found in the April 2008 “Journal of Nutrition.” In this study, type 2 diabetics who ate vegetables had a 10 percent lower heart disease risk when compared to those who seldom ate vegetables.

List of Foods Good for Pre-Diabetics

List of Foods Good for Pre-Diabetics

 Pre-diabetes is a condition marked by blood sugars that are higher than normal but not too high to be diagnosed with diabetes. Most people with pre-diabetes develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders. If you have pre-diabetes, the best way to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes is to lose 5 to 7 percent of your current body weight by following a healthy diet. A healthy diet consists of a variety of foods from each of the food groups.

Grains and Starches

Grains and starches make up an important part of your diet for pre-diabetes. The amount you need depends on your age, sex and activity level but varies from about 6 to 8-oz. a day for most adults over the age of 19. For health and weight management, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends you make at least half of your grain and starch choices whole-grain. A whole-grain food has more fiber than a refined grain food. Fiber in food takes longer to digest helping you to feel satiated longer. Good grain and starch choices for pre-diabetics include whole wheat bread, whole-grain cereal, brown rice, whole-grain pasta, whole-grain crackers, pretzels, oatmeal, quinoa and popcorn.

Fruits

Fruits provide vitamin A, vitamin C, folate and potassium. For pre-diabetes try to eat 1-1/2 to 2 cups of fruit a day. To help with weight control, eating the whole fruit is a healthier choice than drinking the juice because of its fiber content. Good fruit choices for pre-diabetes includes apples, oranges, bananas, pears, peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, melons, berries, dried fruit, unsweetened canned fruit and juice without added sugar.

Vegetables

Vegetables make a good choice for pre-diabetes weight loss because they are low in calories and high in vitamins, minerals and fiber. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends 2 to 3 cups of vegetables a day. In addition to helping you lose weight, high intakes of vegetables will help prevent heart disease, diabetes and some cancers, according to the USDA. Good food choices include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, carrots, green beans, spinach, cauliflower, cabbage, peppers, zucchini, kale, tomatoes and asparagus.

Meat and Beans

Meat can be a source of calories and fat in the diet. To limit your calorie intake for pre-diabetes weight loss, choose more lean cuts of meat such as poultry without the skin, fish, shellfish, ham, pork loin, beef tenderloin and lean ground meat. Eating more meat alternatives, such as beans, can also help you reduce your calorie and fat intake. In addition to being a good source of protein, beans also contain high amounts of fiber and folate. Most adults need 5 to 6 1/2 oz. of meat and beans a day.

Milk

Milk can also be a source of fat and calories, so choose low-fat and nonfat milk and dairy foods for calorie-control. Most Americans do not get enough calcium in their diets and the USDA recommends three servings or cups of milk a day. A serving is equal to 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1-1/2 oz. of natural cheese or 2 oz. of processed cheese. Good milk choices for pre-diabetes includes skim milk, 1 percent fat milk, nonfat or low-fat yogurt and nonfat or low-fat cheese.

Oils

Oils are a concentrated source of calories and intake needs to be limited, especially when trying to lose weight. Most adults need 5 to 7 tsp. of oil, according to the USDA. Oils are low in saturated fat and make healthier choices than fats, like butter. Good oil choices for pre-diabetics include olive oil, vegetable oil, safflower oil and canola oil. Nuts, seeds and avocados are naturally high in healthy oils and also make good choices in small quantities for pre-diabetics.